I’m Back…

…and better than ever!

I’ve finally had a chance to make a few redesigns to my personal website- still on a Tumblr platform, but with a few tweaks to the HTML you’d never know it’s not a 100% “Ethan Original”.

Thanks for visiting, and be on the lookout for new posts in 2014!

Awesome! Finally Instagram will be available for browser use.
Now if Path would just do the same thing, I’d be all set.
instagram:


You’ve asked for Instagram on the web and we’ve listened. Over the next few days, we’ll be rolling out Instagram profiles on the web!
Your web profile features a selection of your recently shared photographs just above your profile photo and bio, giving others a snapshot of the photos you share…

Awesome! Finally Instagram will be available for browser use.

Now if Path would just do the same thing, I’d be all set.

instagram:

You’ve asked for Instagram on the web and we’ve listened. Over the next few days, we’ll be rolling out Instagram profiles on the web!

Your web profile features a selection of your recently shared photographs just above your profile photo and bio, giving others a snapshot of the photos you share…


Noir Bar and Lounge on Glenwood Avenue / Raleigh via lifeismessy

From Michael Lassiter, a graphic designer living in Durham, NC, comes triangletype: a tumblr dedicated completely to type seen in “the wild” of Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, with most photographs coming from reader submissions. The photo above is my personal submission to the blog; you can make your own (if you’re lucky enough to be from RDC) here.
See more of Michael’s work here.
Follow Michael on Twitter here.

Noir Bar and Lounge on Glenwood Avenue / Raleigh via lifeismessy

From Michael Lassiter, a graphic designer living in Durham, NC, comes triangletype: a tumblr dedicated completely to type seen in “the wild” of Raleigh-Durham-Chapel Hill, with most photographs coming from reader submissions. The photo above is my personal submission to the blog; you can make your own (if you’re lucky enough to be from RDC) here.

See more of Michael’s work here.

Follow Michael on Twitter here.

Blogging Tips for Creative People

Christopher Butler, Vice President of NewFangled (a web development company headquartered in North Carolina), spoke recently at the Home Grown lunch and learn series for the Raleigh AIGA on writing and blogging for creatives.

Above is a great infographic he created to summarize the highlights of his presentation (click on the image for a larger/more readable size). Many of the observations and suggestions he makes are simple but powerful ways to make your work stand out from the crowd through the use of descriptive and demonstrative writing. He also gives encouragement to those who just can’t seem to overcome “the blank page”.

More from Chris on writing:

In a world where search relies upon semantics, writing has become the means by which we must differentiate ourselves from everyone else. It’s become how we demonstrate our expertise—by describing it, not just showing it. That’s been a huge shift, especially for creative professionals. It’s no longer enough to have a beautiful portfolio.

But even if none of that was true, I believe that writing about what we do makes us better at doing it. It’s a means by which we can work out our thinking, explore ideas, and gain feedback before we make things, while we’re making them, and after we’ve made them. Writing is good for design.

Read his entire blog post on writing for creatives here.

Follow Chris on Twitter here.

My wife hates it. In fact, I think it’s one of the reasons we rarely go to the movies (that, and we like paying our mortgage on a monthly basis): I never leave the theater before the final credits have rolled. There’s something magical about the credits; there’s a finality in the way they work with the opening credits to bookend the story, making a complete package out of the film you just watched. Just as I read my books “cover to cover”, I watch my films “credits to credits”. A lot of work and creativity goes into the credits, and in this video from PBS Arts: Off Book, “The Art of Film and TV Title Design”, we get an inside look at how the credits (both opening and closing) are made:

The credits are often the first thing we see when we watch a great film or TV show, but the complexity and artistry of title design is rarely discussed. Creators of title sequences are tasked to invent concepts that evoke the core story and themes of the production, and to create a powerful visual experience that pulls the viewer into the film’s world. In this episode we hear the stories of some of the most inventive people working in the field, including the creators of the iconic Mad Men sequence, the hilarious Zombieland opening and “rules” sequences, and the stirring end credits from Blue Valentine.

Read more from the Off Book blog here.
 
Follow Off Book on Twitter here.
 

Manly Decor and the Jack Daniel’s Whiskey Barrel

I was heading home from work yesterday and stopped in at my local Home Depot to pick up some Spring yard essentials. As I was wandering through the garden section of the store, I came across a lopsided stack of old half-barrels- most likely intended for rainwater collection or for planters. Upon further inspection, they weren’t just half-barrels, they were used, Jack Daniel’s whiskey barrels, with a tag declaring their authenticity. They were rustic, hoary, manly. They were beautiful. Without even a remotely useful purpose in mind, I had to have one. Had to. There was something about the worn, weather and whiskey stained wood, and the rusty barrel rings that called out to me. They were thirty dollars each- mere pennies for a trophy of this manly magnitude, but I still couldn’t think of a plausible excuse powerful enough to convince my wife that this rusted and whiskey-logged half-barrel belonged in our home, so, in an act that will come to haunt me through the years, I left with only my plastic wrapped and packaged lawn offerings and headed home. Sitting in my driveway, the ideas began to flow- I could have incorporated it as a crow’s nest on my daughter’s tree house, I could have sealed the interior with silicone and used it as a canoe, I could have installed a tap and used it as originally purposed- to dispense liquids (you don’t have to be a drinker to appreciate how inherently cool it is to have your beverage served from an old whiskey barrel), or, even simpler, I could have filled it with ice and used it as a cooler to serve cold bottled and canned beverages at any occasion. The possibilities are truly endless. If there is one item of home decor that a man should spend his money on (besides a punching bag, and a rack that hangs your bike vertically on the wall), this is it. While I may forever regret that day I passed on an old, Jack Daniel’s whiskey barrel, you don’t have to- go to Home Depot and get one today. And, while you enjoy your manly purchase, I’ll enjoy my wife’s approval.

Finding work you love is very difficult. Most people fail. Even if you succeed, it’s rare to be free to work on what you want till your thirties or forties. But if you have the destination in sight you’ll be more likely to arrive at it. If you know you can love work, you’re in the home stretch, and if you know what work you love, you’re practically there.
I’ve been looking for my next LEGO project, and without a doubt, this is it. I was poring over countless LEGO photo sets on Flickr the other day, and came across this creation from David Cole: the “Taxidermy Deer LEGO Kit”.
The design is clever, but one aspect of the kit that drew me in was the personal attention David had given to every detail- even the graphical instructions are hand-drawn by David, and he personally special-orders the pieces, assembles the kits, and ships them to your door.
You can buy your own ”Taxidermy Deer LEGO Kit” here.
David Cole is a product designer working for Quora (a site that allows users to collect, organize, and share information on the web) and living in San Francisco, California.
Find out more about David Cole and read his blog here.
Check David out on Twitter here.

I’ve been looking for my next LEGO project, and without a doubt, this is it. I was poring over countless LEGO photo sets on Flickr the other day, and came across this creation from David Cole: the “Taxidermy Deer LEGO Kit”.

The design is clever, but one aspect of the kit that drew me in was the personal attention David had given to every detail- even the graphical instructions are hand-drawn by David, and he personally special-orders the pieces, assembles the kits, and ships them to your door.

You can buy your own ”Taxidermy Deer LEGO Kit” here.

David Cole is a product designer working for Quora (a site that allows users to collect, organize, and share information on the web) and living in San Francisco, California.

Find out more about David Cole and read his blog here.

Check David out on Twitter here.